Florida State University

Accepting new graduate students.

Dr. Emily Lemmon

Professor of Biological Science and Neuroscience
Faculty
Biological Science
BRF 215
645-9170

elemmon@neuro.fsu.edu

Interest
Brain and behavioral evolution during the formation of new species.
Current Research
The Lemmon Lab studies how new species originate and evolve, with an emphasis on brain and behavioral evolution in amphibians. The goal is to understand the proximate (how?) and ultimate (why?) mechanisms promoting speciation. The lab applies behavioral, genomic, neurophysiological, and computational approaches to determine how changes in auditory neural circuits lead to diversification of reproductive behaviors during the evolution of new species.
Recent Publications
Anderson, C. B, O. Ospina, P. Beerli, A. R. Lemmon, and E. Moriarty Lemmon (2023). The population genetics of speciation by cascade reinforcement. Ecology and Evolution, 13:e9773.
Booker, W. W., E. Moriarty Lemmon, A. R. Lemmon, M. B. Ptacek, A. T. B. Hassinger, J. Schul, H. C. Gerhardt (2023). Diversification of a polyploid complex: the biogeography and acoustic communication evolution of the North American gray treefrogs throughout the Quaternary.. Molecular Ecology, 32:4863-4879.
Booker W. W., E. Moriarty Lemmon, A. R. Lemmon, M. B. Ptacek, A. T. B. Hassinger, J. Schul, H. C. Gerhardt (2022). The complex history of genome duplication and hybridization in North American gray treefrogs. Molecular Biology and Evolution, 39:msab316.
Hime, P. et al (2021). Phylogenomics reveals ancient gene tree discordance in the Amphibian Tree of Life. Systematic Biology, 70:49–66.
Ospina, O. Lemmon, A. R. Lemmon, M. Dye, C. Zdyrski, S. Holland, D. Stribling, M. L. Kortyna, E. Moriarty Lemmon (2021). Neurogenomic divergence during speciation by reinforcement of mating behaviors in chorus frogs (Pseudacris). BMC Genomics, 22:1-23.

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